[order] Passeriformes | [family] Sylviidae | [latin] Phylloscopus ibericus | [UK] Iberian Chiffchaff | [FR] Pouillot ibérique | [DE] Iberienzilpzalp | [ES] Mosquitero Ibérico | [IT] Luí iberico | [NL] Iberische Tjiftjaf

Iberische Tjiftjaf determination

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Small, slight but often rather chesty warbler, less graceful and active than Willow Warbler. Plumage variable in color tones and in contrast between upper and underparts: west-central and south-western races (nominate callybita, brehmii, exsul, canariensis) brownish-olive above and dull yellowish below, and lacking contrasting features except for dark bill, pale eye-ring within dull yellow supercilium, and usually dark legs. Northern and eastern races abietinus, tristis less warm, more olive, cooler brown or even grey above, and less yellow, even strikingly white below.

Breeds in Spain and portugal in boreal, temperate, and mediterranean climatic zones. Basically a bird of mature lowland woodland with not too dense canopy and fairly copious variety of medium to tallish undergrowth, but may even extend to tree line in mountain woodland or to upper zone of closed forest.

Phylloscopus ibericus breeds in Portugal, Spain and south-west France, which together constitute >90% of its global breeding range. Its European breeding population is large (>360,000 pairs), but the trend between 1970-1990 was unknown (due to confusion with P. collybita, from which it has only recently been separated). Although trend data were again unavailable for the key populations in Spain and France during 1990-2000, the species was stable in Portugal, and there was no evidence to suggest that it declined overall.

Almost wholly insects. Forages mainly high in tree canopy, aslo in bushes and lower down in dense thickets.

This species has an Extent of Occurrence that has not yet been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for the range criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e. Extent of Occurrence less than 20,000 km² in conjunction with both severe fragmentation and fluctuation/declines). It has a large global population, including an estimated 30,000-250,000 individuals in Europe (BirdLife International in prep.). Global population trends have not been quantified, but the species is not believed to approach the thresholds for the population decline criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e. declining more than 30% in ten years or three generations). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern. [conservation status from birdlife.org]

Breeds in west Palearctic in upper and lower middle latitudes, in continental and oceanic boreal, temperate, and mediterranean climatic zones. Basically a bird of mature lowland woodland with not too dense canopy and fairly copious variety of medium to tallish undergrowth, but may even extend to tree line in mountain woodland or to upper zone of closed forest. Only recently split as a seperate species from Common Chiffchaff. Breeds predominantly is Spain and Portugal.

Breeds in portugal and Spain, winters in West Africa