[order] Passeriformes | [family] Emberizidae | [latin] Emberiza rutila | [UK] Chestnut Bunting | [FR] Bruant roux | [DE] R÷telammer | [ES] Semillerito Casta˝o | [IT] Zigolo rutilo | [NL] Rosse Gors

Rosse Gors determination

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Slightly larger and noticeably less delicate than Little Bunting, with proportionately larger head, deeper chest, and longer wings; close in size to Yellow-breasted Bunting but with relatively shorter tail. In all plumages, shows yellow underparts, unstreaked chestnut rump, and little or no white on outer tail-feathers. Male bright chestnut on hood, back, and inner wing-feathers. Females and immature less distinctive, recalling Yellow-breasted Bunting but with less striped head and less sharply streaked underparts.

Breeds in east Palearctic in temperate forest zone of Siberia, in open forests of larch and also broad-leaved trees such as alder and birch, apparently favouring rich ground-cover of herbaceous plants, and dense grass. Frequents mountain slopes and lake shores, and during spring migration also fields and gardens near villages. Wintering birds in India frequent rice stubbles and bushes in cultivation and forest clearings.

No breeding data available. Breeds eastern Siberia, from north-west Irkutsk region east to Sea of Okhotsk, south to Baykal region and probably northern Mongolia and northern Manchuria. 4 autumn records probably true vagrants: Netherlands, 1st-winter female, November 1937; single 1st-winter males, Norway, October 1974, Malta, November 1983, and Yugoslavia, October 1987. 5 records (June-July, September) for Britain, from Scottish and Welsh islands, of doubtful status; some or all may have been escapes from small numbers regularly imported as cagebirds.

seeds, in breeding time feeds chicks insects

This species has a large range, with an estimated global extent of occurrence of 1,000,000-10,000,000 km2. The global population size has not been quantified, but the species is not believed to approach the thresholds for the population size criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e., less than 10,000 mature individuals in conjunction with appropriate decline rates and subpopulation qualifiers). Global population trends have not been quantified, but the species is not believed to approach the thresholds for the population decline criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e., declining more than 30% in ten years or three generations). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern. [conservation status from birdlife.org]

Breeds in east Palearctic in temperate forest zone of Siberia, in open forests of larch and also broad-leaved trees such as alder and birch, apparently favouring rich ground-cover of herbaceous plants, and dense grass. Frequents mountain slopes and lake shores, and during spring migration also fields and gardens near villages. Wintering birds in India frequent rice stubbles and bushes in cultivation and forest clearings.

Migratory, wintering mainly in southern China, Indochina and Burma. Migrates to winter quarters via Ussuriland (south-east Russia), eastern China (west to Shensi) and Korea. Rare records March-June of vagrancy west of winter range, in Sikkim, Nepal, Ladakh (north-west India), and Chitral (northern Pakistan). No reports in western Siberia.