In this section about 60 extinct bird species are described. The species accounts are extracted from the foreword of "Handbook of the birds of the World part 7", written by Errol Fuller. The accounts contain a picture (a drawing) of how the species is perceived by an artist. The story of the extinction is next, followed by the reference of the corresponpding science article. While reading about the extinct birds two conclusions may be drawn. First is it never save to be a huge flightless bird and secondly birds living on remote Islands are extremely vulnerable. Errol Fuller starts his writing as follows:

The subject of recent extinctions is one that seems, increasingly, to be a part of popular culture. Today the words Great Auk (Pinguinus impennis), moa (Dinornithidae), Thylacine or Tasmanian Wolf (Thylacinus cynocephalus), Quagga (Equus quagga) and, of course, Dodo (Raphus cucullatus) are names with which many people are familiar. Yet, while the subject has always held an intrinsic fascination, it is one that comparatively few have cared to pursue - until recently. Now, the increasing vigour of the conservation movement, combined with the new vogue for popular science, has brought with it a fresh awareness of, and enthusiasm for, the subject.
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New bird species are discovered every year. Here we have collected all (as far as e are aware of) all species newly described to science since the year 2000. Discoveries are usually of species having a very small, localized range. Some were discoverd over a decade ago but still not considered a separate species. We have tried to only species of which the ornithologial community is fairly convinced these are a new species. A different way of discovering a new species is to examen specimen in museum collections. It will not come as a surprise many of thte new discoveries are listed on the IUCN lists for threathened species. Accoring to birdlife China may be of special interest to those who seek to make new dicoveries.
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